Book report projects for middle school

If the presenter is able to prove in five minutes that he or she read the book, the student is excused from filing a written report about it. Make A Book Report Sandwich! Teacher chooses part of the text and deletes some of the words. Pretend you are the main character and retell the story.

Which office should they run for? Use this activity to supplement a class lesson in descriptive prose writing. Write a book review for a class publication. Attach a legend to your map. Draw a picture on one side, write the message on the other. Now decide which characters in the book you read should have followed the suggestions in the familiar sayings and why.

Write a book review as it would be done for a newspaper. Suggest a filming location and the actors to play the various roles. Use drawings or magazine cutouts to illustrate Book report projects for middle school along the time line.

Grades PreK—K, 1—2, 3—5, 6—8 If you notice big eye rolls or hear lots of groaning when you mention the words "book reports," it's probably time to shake up your repertoire of book-related activities.

Cut a square form the bottom of a box to serve as a TV screen and make two slits in opposite sides of the box. Write out an imaginary telephone conversation between the two of you in which you discuss the book you read and other things as well.

Prepare a short puppet show to tell the story to the class. Read two books on the same subject and compare and contrast them. Include a one paragraph explanation as to how it applies to your book not in the paper itself—on your "title page.

Video tape oral book reports and then have the children take turns taking the video home for all to share. Do the previous activity, but find a buddy to help you.

The teacher commissioned a friend to draw slices of ham, tomato, and Swiss cheese; lettuce leaves; a layer of mayonnaise, and a couple of slices of bread. On the ham slice, the student described the plot.

Attach paragraphs to the objects describing each one of the basics listed above. Keep a reading journal and record your thoughts at the end of each period of reading. Write a ballad or song about the characters and events in your story. One day, while exploring postings to the MiddleWeb ListservHayden found an idea that filled the bill!

The teacher commissioned a friend to draw slices of ham, tomato, and Swiss cheese; lettuce leaves; a layer of mayonnaise, and a couple of slices of bread.

Write the title of your book. Five of the questions can be about general content, but the other five must require more thinking.

After reading a book, a student completes an index card with information about the book. A bulletin board with a caption about laughter or a picture of someone laughing at excerpts from funny stories rewritten by the children from material in humorous books.

Write a book review for a class publication. Why is it appropriate? Pretend that you are one of the characters in the book you read.

Be sure that the vocabulary you use is appropriate for that age group. The student concludes by awarding a thumbs up or thumbs down on the book.

Each student creates a "Ten Facts About [book title]" sheet that lists ten facts he or she learned from reading the book. Make a flannel board story. Nominate one of the characters for an office in local, state or national government.

They were instructed to include the following:The classic book report isn't the only way to think about books.

Fun and Creative Book Report Ideas for Middle School Students

We can keep students engaged with book projects. Check out these ideas you can try in a middle school classroom. How many middle school readers have you seen who look as engaged as the children in this picture?

If the true learning objective is to ignite a student's passion for literature and provide an opportunity to demonstrate understanding through a variety of modalities, then maybe it's time to move beyond the book report.

Middle School Summer Assignment Each student must create a book report using the format provided.

The Best Book-Report Books for Middle Schoolers

Books can be chosen from the list attached or any age appropriate book not listed. Middle School Book Report Format Paragraph Order: 1. Introduction 2. Setting and characters—this part may need to be broken into separate paragraphs.

The classic book report isn't the only way to think about books. We can keep students engaged with book projects. Check out these ideas you can try in a middle school.

If you notice big eye rolls or hear lots of groaning when you mention the words "book reports," any of these 25 alternative book-related activities are the perfect remedy. Teachers. Teachers Home Lessons and Ideas Classroom Activities: 25 Book Report Alternatives.

Make this into a little book of 3 folded pages, stapled in the middle (Outside paper is for title of book.) Older children can put it on the computer filling the unused part with a square for later illustrations. Be Book Report Pen Pals and share book reports with children in another school.

Make a crossword puzzle using ideas from a.

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Book report projects for middle school
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